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Getting Started
Getting an entry level job or starting a new career can be frustrating, but it doesn’t have to be. Often sheer determination is not enough, you also need a wealth of resources and knowledgeable guidance. You will have full access to these resources and guidance here.

Entry-level jobs often represent the first step in long and fruitful careers. No matter the industry, young job seekers must typically start out in entry-level positions before assuming greater, more challenging roles. With the advancement of technology, many entry-level job hopefuls turn to the internet to find employment.

This web site holds thousands upon thousands of avenues for aspiring workers to find entry-level employment. With the click of a mouse, job hunters can access employment opportunities in a myriad of industries, including fast food, retail, administration, restaurant, and delivery.

One of the greatest advantages of looking for work on the internet includes the ability to apply for jobs online from the comforts of home. Both large and small businesses often provide ways for job seekers to apply for entry-level employment directly online. Most online application processes take between five and ten minutes to complete and ask similar questions as traditional paper counterparts. Using the internet to find entry-level work online may prove one of the easiest avenues to begin a new career. Log on to find out why so many people use the internet to find entry-level jobs every day.

What Exactly is an Entry Level Job?
Traditionally, entry-level jobs stand as basic, part-time employment opportunities available at most national and major regional corporations. An example of an entry-level job may include cashier at a local fast food restaurant. Most entry-level workers assume roles heavily involved in service. Many entry-level positions consist of dealing with the public on a regular basis, food preparation, or sanitation. An entry-level job serves as a doorway or gateway, in many cases, leading toward valuable careers in a multitude of industries. For many, entry-level employment provides the opportunity for a budding lifetime of fruitful work.

The average entry-level job requires little-to-no previous experience to gain employment. During the hiring process, applicants with or without experience often stand as great a chance as the next to find work, often regardless of industry. Due to the lack of managerial and administrative responsibility, entry-level jobs often serve as ideal avenues for prospective professionals to hone skills and adapt in challenging work environments, consequently building additional work-related skills outside of typical job duties.

Workers assuming entry-level jobs often enjoy the luxury of choosing between full-time and part-time scheduling. Many businesses only offer part-time entry-level jobs. However, some major corporations and large, national chains need to hire applicants seeking full-time employment as entry-level crew members. Part-time jobs typically yield between 15 and 30 hours per week. Full-time entry-level employment opportunities often provide 32 to 40 hours a week, with some businesses potentially offering overtime programs, like time-and-a-half or holiday pay.

Starting pay for entry-level associates generally falls around minimum wage. Laws governing minimum wage vary state to state. In states with higher standards of living, minimum wage may fall anywhere between $9.00 and $10.00 per hour. The nationwide minimum wage mandated by the federal government sits at $7.25 an hour. Applicants taking part in hiring processes for entry-level work generally end up making somewhere between the federal minimum and $10.00 per hour to start. Promotion and merit may increase pay over time and lead to generous salary options in managerial or supervisory roles within a company. Some entry-level positions, like barista jobs at Starbucks, offer employee benefits, including healthcare coverage and special discounts on products and services.